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Project 1917 is a series of events that took place a hundred years ago as described by those involved. It is composed only of diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers and other documents

Our Party is ahead of the other internationalist parties; this is a fact now. And it is in duty bound to take the initiative, to come forward with a programme answering questions about imperialism. It will be a scandal and a shame if we do not do this. See more

We may be asked: aren’t we going to fight against KornilovCommander in Chief of the Petrograd command - from 18 March 1917? Of course we must! But this is not the same thing; there is a dividing Line here, which is being stepped over by some Bolsheviks who fall into compromise and allow themselves to be carried away by the course of events. See more

It is all too advantageous for the Mensheviks to put about false rumours and allegations to the effect that the government they support is saving the revolution. To believe these rumours, to support them directly or indirectly, would mean, on the part of the Bolsheviks, betraying the cause of the revolution. See more

The world proletarian revolution is clearly maturing. The question of its relation to the state is acquiring practical importance. The elements of opportunism that accumulated over the decades of comparatively peaceful development have given rise to the trend of social-chauvinism which dominated the official socialist parties throughout the world. See more

I was in Helsinki for a couple of days. Ilyich wanted to see me all the way to the station, right up to the last corner. We agreed that I’d come again.

Ilyich has settled in Helsingfors. He sent me a letter written in invisible ink asking me to come, told me his address and even drew a map showing me how to get there without asking anyone. But when I heated up the letter over a lamp, the corner of the map burnt off. The Yemelianovs have got me a passport too – the passport of an old working woman from Sestroretsk. See more

Living in a hut near the Razliv station where Ilyich was hiding was no longer possible. Autumn arrived, and Ilyich decided to move to Finland, where he wanted to write his planned State and Revolution which he had already done a lot of extracts, and had considered from all sides. See more

I keep recalling those memorable days and nights. A cold, starry night. The smell of freshly mown hay. A cloud of smoke from the little bonfire where we brewed tea in a big kettle. Strolling with Vladimir Ilyich. See more

Every revolution means a sharp turn in the lives of a vast number of people. Unless the time is ripe for such a turn, no real revolution can take place. And just as any turn in the life of an individual teaches him a great deal and brings rich experience and great emotional stress, so a revolution teaches an entire people very rich and valuable lessons in a short space of time. See more

We must clearly and decidedly state that those who advised comrades Lenin and Zinovyev not to be arrested did right. We must clearly respond to the harassment of the bourgeois press that would unnerve our laborers. Harassment against Lenin and Zinovyev is harassment against us, against the party, against revolutionary democracy. See more

Our hide-out was secure. But we still had to be vigilant. The police investigation assumed unprecedented dimensions. Hunting for Vladimir Ilyich, they scoured every house in a number of neighbourhoods. Police dogs combed Petersburg. This, of course, was a little unnerving. Work on the Sixth Congress of our Party, taking place semi-illegally in the city, was being directed by Vladimir Ilyich from our shelter. See more

I demand an urgent, direct rejection of the deceitful messages in the Russian press, according to which I am an intermediary for the Ministry of Internal Affairs in talks with Lenin or someone else.

Received an interesting letter from Lenin from his Finnish underground. In it, Lenin issued directives to us to collect information abroad, and based on it, and information received from Russia, to expose vile accusations of Kerensky and Co.

In the hut we have immediately felt ourselves calmer. Life began to “normilise.” Around us there was no one for miles. Tired and exhausted by work and hardships, Vladimir Ilyich enjoyed involuntary rest for the first couple of days. See more

Certain newspapers have started an insane witch hunt against us, accusing us of espionage and plotting with the enemy government. They implicate Ganetsky and Kozlovsky and provide no facts. See more

Age: 47
Birth name: Vladimir Ulyanov
Views: Bolshevik
Occupation: Revolutionary

Today:

+13
in Petrograd
+9
in Moscow