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Project 1917 is a series of events that took place a hundred years ago as described by those involved. It is composed only of diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers and other documents

Russian newspapers today give an overview of the big Parisian scandal: AlmereydaEvgeny Vigo is a radical French anarchist, socialist and internationalist. His alias, Miguel Almereida, is an anagram of the expression "this shit" (fr. - y'a la merde). He was found dead in the prison cell. is killed in prison, the reputation of six ministers and their deputies was compromised in “Bonnet Rouge”The satirical radical French newspaper ("The Phrygian Cap"), Clemenceau fulminates. The government is more than shaken.  

Elections. Everyone is calm. Many people won’t vote - and they will regret it later.

Overall, here in Russia we have a much better mutual understanding and liking with Americans than with the British. We can only accomplish something with Americans. See more

The spectacle of the street. A line forms at the tobacconist: then soldiers procure cigarettes by the case, settle on the sidewalk, and start to sell them, individually, to pedestrians. Very resourceful. “Revolutionary People,” an evening newspaper of the socialist revolutionaries, in response publishes a heated protest by a war veteran (a comfrey, a person from the trenches). See more

A great discovery. I read Dostoevsky’s The Idiot from start to finish, unable to tear myself away. There is a character in the book called Myshkin – an idiot, a Christian, meek and kind with human frailties; a young boy, Kolya; a general’s wife - kind-hearted, but excitable woman; and another woman, Nastasya Filippovna, who has been corrupted through no fault of her own. See more

There’s anything you want in the Finland, Vyborg, Tammerfors and other train stations. The old custom remains in force: you pay 3 to 4 marks at the buffet entrance and you can eat whatever you want. Hors d'oeuvre a plenty. Finns are very poorly disposed to Russians. The Finns are kinder. Russian troops are not kicked around. See more

Should we say the Russian Revolution is founded upon the delusion that man is good by nature? Or should we rejoice that the Russian has an unusually clear understanding of natural laws and greater bravery in the face of collective prejudice? See more

I refuse to blame Russian soldiers, even now, considering the current situation. Only heroes fight, or those who are forced to. It is impossible to make everyone be a hero.

Once again, this morning, cars full of armed men at the ready, with fixed bayonets. From 2.30 to 3, there was heavy shooting on Nevsky Prospect and Liteiny Prospect. Apparently, the crowd was forcibly dispersed in front of the Tauride Palace.

The Russian offensive has surged back. Brusilov claims that the Russian army will be unable to survive the winter due to the complete state of chaos within the country and because of desertion – which will be the subject of a speech to the Constituent Assembly. See more

There is a rumour that Kerensky personally led the attack. Such a thing would be a wonder if true. However, rumours also have it that he was forced to go to the front as, were he to stay in Petrograd as should have been the case, his order to attack would not have been delivered.

At the Officer’s shop I saw the following notice: ‘No butter, no cheese’. This morning my family could not fry the veal we had for want of fat.

Russians don’t like to preen or to put on airs, even on the subject of their own nation. A Russian loves his country profoundly and knows its worth, but keeps it to himself. A Frenchman will boast about having been at the front and will tell you of his heroic feats, his sufferings and his injuries. He will do all this because he thinks he has done something extraordinary. The Russian may tell you has been at the front if there is some reason do so, but for him this is an absolutely ordinary fact. He won’t think for a minute of bragging about it.

Age: 27
Rank: Lieutenant
Occupation: Member of the French military mission in Russia

Today:

+13
in Petrograd
+9
in Moscow