New post
Free
history
Non-fiction

Project 1917 is a series of events that took place a hundred years ago as described by those involved. It is composed only of diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers and other documents

It was a clear cold day. During the morning I took a walk. Marie and Anastasia were in the same condition, lying in a dark room and coughing badly; they have such bad colds. Marie's and Anastasia's high temperatures were high and alternatively rose and fall. They also were weak. During the day I took a long walk and worked; Dolgorukov and I finished the path to the old summer house. In the evening I stayed up with Anna and Lili Dehn.

It was a wonderful cold sunny day. I sat with Dolgorukov as always now with the accompaniment of one of the officers of the guard. I took a good walk, Marie and Anastasia's condition was the same as yesterday. They slept badly and Marie's high temperature broke the record, since during the day her temperature was 40.9 degrees. The rest improved quite a bit. During the day I walked a long way and worked. Until dinner I read, and in the evening I sat with the children until 10:00 and we drank tea twice. 

It was a cloudy day and thawing. In the morning I took a walk with Dolgorukov for three or four hours. Now there is plenty of time to read for my own enjoyment, there is sufficient time to sit up with the children. Marie*s strong temperature continued at 40.6 degrees. Anastasia has complications with her ears, though yesterday they punctures her right ear drum. During the day I took a walk to the old park.

It continued to thaw; the day was overcast. I took a walk in the morning for half an hour. Everyone here is busy. Marie continued to have a high temperature, 40.6 degrees, and Anastasia's ears ached. Everyone else felt fine. I took another short walk during the day and worked for a while. In the evening we sat with Anna and Lili Dehn.

It began to thaw. In the morning Beckendorf and Apraksin were with us; as they left they said goodbye. At 11:00 we went to Mass, Alix got up today. Olga and Tatiana are much better today, but Marie and Anastasia are worse. They have headaches and earaches and are vomiting, I took a short walk and worked in the garden for a while with Dolgorukov. After tea I continued to put my papers in order. In the evening we all gathered together. 

It was a cold day with a wind blowing. I took a walk for half an hour and then sat with the children while Alix was at Mass. During the day Kerensky came and distracted me from the work on the ice. At first he spoke with Alix and then with me. After tea I read. During the evening I sat alone — we drank tea together and slept in the same place.

Burned letters together with Lily. Dined with Nicholas, Alexei and Olga in the playing room. Went to Annushka’s and spent some time there together with everyone else. The commandant reads all our correspondence, while all our parcels undergo thorough checks, along with everything else.

Michael came to see me and we discussed the idea of poor Nicky coming to England.

In the morning I received Benckendorf. I learned from him that we had stayed here long enough. It was a pleasant realization. I continued to burn my letters and papers. Anastasia had an earache, so now she went with the rest of them. From 3 o'clock until 4:30 I walked in the garden with Dolgorukov and worked in the garden. The weather was unpleasant with a wind at about 2 degrees above frost. At 6:45 we went to vespers in the camp church, Alix took her bath before I took mine. I went to see Anna, Lili Dehn and the rest of our friends.

Again it was a wonderfully quiet day. I took a walk from 11 until 12 o'clock. During the day Alix finally wsnt outside with us on our walk. She watched as we worked on the ice. The sun shone pleasantly, I read until dinner. Alix said vespers for the children. I sat with Tatiana until 11 o'clock.

I slept well. Bonda, Romei, Marcengo, Lontkevich and I took a walk for about an hour. The weather was mild, but all day it had been snowing. After tea I began unpacking things. I had dinner with Alix and played bezik with her. 

Quickly and happily we arrived at Tsarskoe Selo at 11:30. Good Lord, what a difference in the streets and the palace surroundings, within the park were sentries, and on the porch such insolence! I went upstairs and there 124 I saw dear Alix and our dear children. She appeared well and healthy. See more

During the night there was a storm and a lot of snow fell. The day became sunny and quiet. Olga and Tatiana went out into the air for the first time and sat around the balcony while I walked. After breakfast I worked for a long time. The youngest slept a little more and felt better. We passed all the time together.

Your majesty should consider himself as if he were arrested.

I was at Moghilev during the day. At 10:15 I signed the farewell notice to the Army. At 10:30 I came to the duty house where I said goodbye to all the ranking staff 121 members and the management. At home I said goodbye to the officers and Cossacks of the Convoy and the Composite (reserve) regiment. My heart almost broke. See more

I appeared before the Moscow Soviet. The workers bombarded me with a veritable hail of highly aggressive questions, such as “Why has Grand Duke Nicholas been appointed Commander in Chief? “and “Why is Nicholas II allowed to travel freely throughout the whole of Russia?” These questions were undoubtedly prompted by a feeling of enmity towards the government, and I was disturbed to see the extent to which such attitudes, typical of the Petrograd Soviet, have now been embraced in Moscow. I realized that I would have to give a clear, unequivocal and firm answer to the workers, so I told them:

“The Grand Duke Nicholas was appointed by Nicholas II before his abdication; however he will not remain in the post of Senior Commander in Chief. Now Nicholas II is in my hands:  in the hands of the Prosecutor General of Russia. Comrades, I remind you that up until this time, the Russian revolution has taken place without bloodshed, and I do not wish, nor will I allow bloodshed to cast a shadow over the revolution. I shall never be the Marat of the Russian revolution. Very shortly, Nicholas II, under my personal supervision, will be taken to the harbour and sent to England by steamer.”

I received two more letters from dear Alix brought by officers from the regiment. At 11 o'clock I received Williams, Janin, Ryckel: all were warm and sympathetically treated. I had breakfast with Mama, and sat with her until 2:30. I received Coanda, Romei, Marcengo, and Lontkevich. I took a walk for about an hour. The weather was mild but all day it had been snowing. After tea I began packing things. I had dinner with Mama and played bezik with her.

I feel awfully sick at heart– what else might happen? Lord, help us! Such cruelty! I feel very ashamed of everything that has happened. It is vital that all this should not affect the course of the war; otherwise, all will be lost. Nicky came to dinner. He stayed until eleven o’clock. Two huge red flags have been hung up above the City Duma right before Nicky’s eyes!

I am deeply distressed at the events of the last week.  My thoughts are always with you, and I shall always remain your faithful and devoted friend, just as I have always been in the past, as you know.

In the morning I was very happy, I received two letters from dear Alix and two letters from Marie. The wife of Captain Kalobkin from the Finnish regiment brought them. I took a walk in the garden. Mama came to breakfast. We sat together until 3 o'clock, I took a walk; again it started snowing. After tea I received Williams. At 8 o'clock I took Mama to the train.

Age: 48
Lives in: Alexander Palace, Tsarskoye Selo, Russian Empire
Title: Emperor of All the Russias, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Finland
Rank: Colonel
Nickname: Nicky

Today:

-5
in Petrograd
0
in Moscow